Working from home with an autistic child has been the greatest challenge and the greatest eyeopener

The writer’s son, Jack, peers outside using binoculars. His parents have had to repeatedly deny his requests during the pandemic to go to the playground across the street. (Mark Taylor) I’ve worked in busy newsrooms and offices and learned to block out blaring televisions, ringing phones and loud colleagues. I’ve covered many difficult and dangerous stories that left me physically and mentally drained. I never imagined my own home would be the most challenging work environment I’ve ever been placed in. For the first few weeks of this pandemic, every day I had to explain to my 12-year-old autistic son, Jack, why he couldn’t go to the playground across the street. Making it even more difficult was the fact that other kids never stopped congregating there. It made Jack think he had done something wrong not to be allowed in the park. He just couldn’t understand why something my […]

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