Military unsure how physical access is handled at more than 100 installations

Military unsure how physical access is handled at more than 100 installations

Today, surplus U.S. military planes are stored in the largest airplane boneyard in the world, operated by the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group AMARG at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson, Arizona The Pentagon doesn’t know how military installations are using physical access control systems (PACS) to manage entry because the Army, Navy and Marine Corps don’t track that information. PACS scan credentials against FBI and other government databases, and after several shootings at military posts, the Department of Defense (DOD) recommended fielding more such systems to address weaknesses. An Army officer shot 45 people, killing 13, at Fort Hood, Texas, in November 2009. And a Navy contractor shot 16 people, killing 12, at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C., four years later. The Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC) developed the PACS used by the Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps and Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) — called the Defense Biometric Identification System (DBIDS). The Army developed its own system known as Automatic Installation Entry (AIE). Both systems connect to the Pentagon’s Identity Matching Engine for Security and Analysis (IMESA), which uses government databases to vet a person based on the risk they pose. To date, IMESA has flagged […]

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